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Towards north-south interconnectedness: a critique of gender dualities in sustainable development, the environment and women's health

Simon-Kumar, Rachel, MacBride-Stewart, Sara, Baker, Susan and Patnaik Saxena, L. 2018. Towards north-south interconnectedness: a critique of gender dualities in sustainable development, the environment and women's health. Gender, Work and Organization 25 (3) , pp. 246-263. 10.1111/gwao.12193

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Abstract

Well-established bodies of scholarship that inform contemporary global debates on gender, environment and health are fundamentally based on dualistic representations of women, such as First/Third World, rich/poor and victim/polluter. In this paper, we argue that recent socioeconomic transitions — affluence in the global South and rising inequality in the global North — demand the development of gender analytical frameworks that better recognize the diversity of roles that women play in the changing global social order that impact on their health. Our paper (a) critiques the dualisms found in three influential bodies of scholarship, namely gender, environment and development, science, technology and society, and sustainable development; and (b) through our critique, conceptually develops an ‘interconnectedness’ perspective that focuses on the increasingly shared lived realities of women in the North and the South, to understand the emerging complex relationships between gender, environment and health.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Social Sciences (Includes Criminology and Education)
Uncontrolled Keywords: gender; environment; health; sustainable development; North-South
Publisher: Wiley
ISSN: 0968-6673
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 3 August 2017
Date of Acceptance: 8 May 2017
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2019 22:42
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/101411

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