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A feasibility study of awake videolaryngoscope-assisted intubation in patients with periglottic tumour using the channelled King Vision® videolaryngoscope

Markova, L., Stopar-Pintaric, T., Luzar, T., Benedik, J. and Hodzovic, Iljaz 2017. A feasibility study of awake videolaryngoscope-assisted intubation in patients with periglottic tumour using the channelled King Vision® videolaryngoscope. Anaesthesia 72 (4) , pp. 512-518. 10.1111/anae.13734

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Abstract

Airway management in patients with periglottic tumour is a high-risk procedure with potentially serious consequences. There is no consensus on how best to secure the airway in this group of patients. We conducted a feasibility study of awake tracheal intubation using a King Vision® videolaryngoscope with a channelled blade in a cohort of 25 patients, with a periglottic tumour requiring diagnostic or radical surgery. We used 10% and 4% lidocaine to topicalise the airway and midazolam and remifentanil for sedation. We recorded the success rate, number of attempts, time to obtain glottic view, time to intubation and complications. Twenty-three of the 25 patients (92%, 95%CI 75–98%) were intubated with the awake videolaryngoscope-assisted technique, with 17/23 (74%, 95%CI 54–87%) intubations achieved at the first attempt. Five patients required two and one patient, three attempts at intubation. Two patients (8%, 95%CI 2–25%) could not tolerate the procedure due to inadequate topical anaesthesia. Median (IQR [range]) times to obtain glottic view and to intubate were 19 (17–22 [10–30]) s and 49 (42–71 [33–107]) s, respectively. Traces of blood in the airway were observed in 4/25 (16%, 95%CI 6–35%) patients. Although airway management in this group of patients was expected to be difficult, successful awake intubation with the King Vision videolaryngoscope was achieved in the majority of patients within less than a minute. This study highlights a number of potential advantages of awake videolaryngoscope-assisted intubation over other awake methods of securing the airway in patients with upper airway obstruction due to periglottic mass.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN: 0003-2409
Date of Acceptance: 5 October 2016
Last Modified: 23 May 2018 13:24
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/101850

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