Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Patients' attitudes and perceptions towards treatment of hypothyroidism in general practice: an in-depth qualitative interview study

Dew, R., King, K, Okosime, O. E., Pearce, S., Donovan, G., Taylor, Peter, Leese, G., Hickey, J., Razvi, S., Dayan, Colin and Wilkes, S. 2017. Patients' attitudes and perceptions towards treatment of hypothyroidism in general practice: an in-depth qualitative interview study. BJGP Open , BJGP-2017-0125. 10.3399/bjgpopen17X100977

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (572kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background Suboptimal thyroid hormone replacement is common in patients with hypothyroidism and the behavioural factors underlying this are poorly understood. Aim To explore the attitudes and perceptions of patients to thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Design & setting An in-depth qualitative interview study with patients with hypothyroidism residing in Northumberland, and Tyne and Wear, UK. Method Twenty-seven patients participated, of which 15 patients had thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels within the reference range (0.4–4.0 mU/L) and 12 patients had TSH levels outside the reference range. A grounded theory approach was used to explore and develop emerging themes, which were mapped to the health belief model (HBM). Results Patients generally had a low understanding of their condition or of the consequences of suboptimal thyroid hormone replacement. Patients that had experienced hypothyroid symptoms at initial diagnosis had a better perception of disease susceptibility, and this was reflected in excellent adherence to levothyroxine in this group of patients. The main benefits of optimal thyroid replacement were improved wellbeing and performance. However, patients who remained unwell despite a normal serum TSH level felt that their normal result presented a barrier to further evaluation of their symptoms by their GP.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Publisher: British Journal of General Practice
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 10 July 2017
Date of Acceptance: 28 February 2017
Last Modified: 11 Jul 2017 14:56
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/102247

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics