Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Consumption patterns: A proposed model for measurement of solution palatability in pigs

Frías, D., Tadich, T., Franco-Rosselló, R., Dwyer, Dominic M. and Figueroa, J. 2016. Consumption patterns: A proposed model for measurement of solution palatability in pigs. Journal of Animal Science 94 (S3) , pp. 103-105. 10.2527/jas.2015-9699

[img]
Preview
PDF - Submitted Pre-Print Version
Download (142kB) | Preview

Abstract

In animal production, the palatability of feeds or solutions has typically been inferred from measurements of preference or acceptance. However, laboratory studies in rats have demonstrated that palatability quantified through the analysis of the microstructure of licking can dissociate from simple measures of consumption. The aim of this study was to evaluate palatability in pigs by using consumption patterns. Pigs (n = 24) were exposed (in pairs, with video recording) to different sucrose solutions (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32%) over 7 consecutive 10-min tests (1 concentration/d). Total consumption, number of consumption approaches (A), and real consumption time (RCT) were measured. Palatability was estimated through consumption pattern (RCT/A), analogous to the licks/bout measure used in rats. Data was analyzed by sucrose concentration. Spearman correlation coefficients were estimated between the logarithm of sucrose concentration and total consumption, A, RCT, and RCT/A. Total consumption and RCT showed inverted U functions relative to sucrose concentration. Consumption pattern (RCT/A) presented a dose effect (P < 0.005) and positive correlations with sucrose concentration (R = 0.23, P = 0.034). As with rats, consumption pattern could represent an interesting and novel measure of feeding behavior, reflecting palatability in pigs.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Publisher: American Society of Animal Science
ISSN: 1525-3163
Date of Acceptance: 21 November 2015
Last Modified: 30 Jun 2019 06:23
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/102909

Citation Data

Cited 1 time in Google Scholar. View in Google Scholar

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics