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Interaction between prenatal risk and infant parasympathetic and sympathetic stress reactivity predicts early aggression

Suurland, J., van der Heijden, K.B., Huijbregts, S.C.J., Van Goozen, Stephanie and Swaab, H. 2017. Interaction between prenatal risk and infant parasympathetic and sympathetic stress reactivity predicts early aggression. Biological Psychology 128 , pp. 98-104. 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2017.07.005

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Abstract

Nonreciprocal action of the parasympathetic (PNS) and sympathetic (SNS) nervous systems, increases susceptibility to emotional and behavioral problems in children exposed to adversity. Little is known about the PNS and SNS in interaction with early adversity during infancy. Yet this is when the physiological systems involved in emotion regulation are emerging and presumably most responsive to environmental influences. We examined whether parasympathetic respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and sympathetic pre-ejection period (PEP) response and recovery at six months, moderate the association between cumulative prenatal risk and physical aggression at 20 months (N = 113). Prenatal risk predicted physical aggression, but only in infants exhibiting coactivation of PNS and SNS (i.e., increase in RSA and decrease in PEP) in response to stress. These findings indicate that coactivation of the PNS and SNS in combination with prenatal risk is a biological marker for the development of aggression.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords: Aggression; Stress reactivity; Autonomic nervous system; Prenatal risk; Infancy
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0301-0511
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 29 August 2017
Date of Acceptance: 11 July 2017
Last Modified: 20 Jul 2018 18:45
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/104045

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