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Transient convergence and relational sensibility: beyond the modern constitution of nature

Anderson, Jonathan Mark 2009. Transient convergence and relational sensibility: beyond the modern constitution of nature. Emotion, Space and Society 2 (2) , pp. 120-127. 10.1016/j.emospa.2009.10.001

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Abstract

The paper builds on the critique of what Latour (1993) terms the ‘modern constitution’ and its configuration of nature as an independent and external entity to human culture and politics. The paper suggests that, firstly, moving beyond the modern constitution to a world of amodern or postnature ( [Braun, 2004] and Hayles, 1999 K. Hayles, How We Became Post-Human, University of Chicago Press, Chicago (1999). [Hayles, 1999] ) marks a shift from ontological stability to ontological instability, where ‘nature’ is now constituted by merging and emerging ontologies. In this unstable new world order, the paper argues that postnature should be understood as a transient convergence in a context of flow, union, and divergence. This perspective emphasises the role that emotions play in this relationship, arguing that they are both part and product of the transient convergence of postnature. ‘Humans’ are now constituted in and with the temporary coincidences that form ‘nature’, and the relational sensibility that is produced through this convergence is vital to fully understand the post-natural world. The paper concludes by suggesting that this postnature can provide new premises for protecting the world of which we are a part.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Geography and Planning (CPLAN)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Nature; Postnature; Transient convergence; Emotion; Relational sensibility
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 1755-4586
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 02:10
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/10526

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