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Survey to explore understanding of the principles of aseptic technique: qualitative content analysis with descriptive analysis of confidence and training

Gould, Dinah, Chudleigh, J, Purssell, E, Hawker, Clare, Gaze, Sarah, James, D, Lynch, M, Pope, N and Drey, N 2018. Survey to explore understanding of the principles of aseptic technique: qualitative content analysis with descriptive analysis of confidence and training. American Journal of Infection Control 46 (4) , pp. 393-396. 10.1016/j.ajic.2017.10.008

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Abstract

Background: In many countries aseptic procedures are undertaken by nurses in the general ward setting but variation in practice has been reported and there is evidence that the principles underpinning aseptic technique are not well comprehended. Methods: Survey employing a brief, purpose-designed, self-reported questionnaire Findings: Response rate was 72%. Of these 65% nurses described aseptic technique in terms of the procedure used to undertake it and 46% understood the principles of asepsis. The related concepts of cleanliness and sterilisation were frequently confused. Additionally 72% reported that they not had received training for at least five years, 92% were confident of their ability to undertake aseptic technique and 90% reported that they had not been re-assessed since initial training. Qualitative analysis confirmed a lack of clarity about the meaning of aseptic technique. Discussion: Nurses’ understanding of aseptic technique and the concepts of sterility and cleanliness is inadequate in line with previous studies, potentially placing patients at risk. Conclusion: Nurses’ understanding of the principles of asepsis could be improved. Further studies should establish the generalisability of the study findings. Possible improvements include renewed emphasis during initial nurse education, greater opportunity for updating knowledge and skills post-qualification and audit of practice.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Healthcare Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier: 12 months
ISSN: 0196-6553
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 7 November 2017
Date of Acceptance: 7 October 2017
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2020 14:50
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/106272

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