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Microfluidic encapsulation supports stem cell viability, proliferation and neuronal differentiation

Hidalgo San Jose, Lorena, Stephens, Philip, Song, Bing and Barrow, David 2018. Microfluidic encapsulation supports stem cell viability, proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Tissue Engineering Part C Methods 24 (3) , pp. 158-170. 10.1089/ten.TEC.2017.0368

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Abstract

Stem cell encapsulation technology demonstrates much promise for the replacement of damaged tissue in several diseases, including spinal cord injury (SCI). The use of biocompatible microcapsules permits the control of stem cell fate in situ to facilitate the replacement of damaged/lost tissue. In this work, a novel customized microfluidic device was developed for the reproducible encapsulation of neural stem cells (NSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) within monodisperse, alginate-collagen microcapsules. Both cell types survived within the microcapsules for up to 21 days in culture. Stem cells demonstrated retention of their multipotency and neuronal differentiation properties upon selective release from the microcapsules, as demonstrated by high proliferation rates and the production of stem cell and neuronal lineage markers. When cell-laden microcapsules were transplanted into an organotypic SCI model, the microcapsules effectively retained the transplanted stem cells at the site of implantation. Implanted cells survived over a 10 day period in culture after transplantation and demonstrated commitment to a neural lineage. Our device provides a quick, effective, and aseptic method for the encapsulation of two different stem cell types (DPSCs and NSCs) within alginate-collagen microcapsules. Since stem cells were able to retain their viability and neural differentiation capacity within such microcapsules, this method provides a useful technique to study stem cell behavior within three-dimensional environments. View Article Tools Share Abstract Stem cell encapsulation technology demonstrates much promise for the replacement of damaged tissue in several diseases, including spinal cord injury (SCI). The use of biocompatible microcapsules permits the control of stem cell fate in situ to facilitate the replacement of damaged/lost tissue. In this work, a novel customized microfluidic device was developed for the reproducible encapsulation of neural stem cells (NSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) within monodisperse, alginate-collagen microcapsules. Both cell types survived within the microcapsules for up to 21 days in culture. Stem cells demonstrated retention of their multipotency and neuronal differentiation properties upon selective release from the microcapsules, as demonstrated by high proliferation rates and the production of stem cell and neuronal lineage markers. When cell-laden microcapsules were transplanted into an organotypic SCI model, the microcapsules effectively retained the transplanted stem cells at the site of implantation. Implanted cells survived over a 10 day period in culture after transplantation and demonstrated commitment to a neural lineage. Our device provides a quick, effective, and aseptic method for the encapsulation of two different stem cell types (DPSCs and NSCs) within alginate-collagen microcapsules. Since stem cells were able to retain their viability and neural differentiation capacity within such microcapsules, this method provides a useful technique to study stem cell behavior within three-dimensional environments.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Dentistry
Engineering
Publisher: Mary Ann Leibert / Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN: 1937-3384
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 19 December 2017
Date of Acceptance: 18 August 2017
Last Modified: 29 Jan 2019 21:45
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/107687

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