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A rapidly acquired foraging-based working memory task, sensitive to hippocampal lesions, reveals age-dependent and age-independent behavioural changes in a mouse model of amyloid pathology

Evans, Charles, Hvoslefeide, Martha, Thomas, Rhian, Kidd, Emma and Good, Mark 2018. A rapidly acquired foraging-based working memory task, sensitive to hippocampal lesions, reveals age-dependent and age-independent behavioural changes in a mouse model of amyloid pathology. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory 149 , pp. 46-57. 10.1016/j.nlm.2018.02.004

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Abstract

Three experiments examined the ability of mice to forage efficiently for liquid rewards in pots located in an open field arena. Search behaviour was unconstrained other than by the walls of the arena. All mice acquired the task within 4 days of training, with one trial per day. Experiment 1 tested the hypothesis that hippocampal lesions would disrupt foraging behaviour using extramaze cues. Mice with hippocampal lesions showed normal latency to initiate foraging and to complete the task relative to sham-operated mice. However, lesioned mice showed increased perseverative responding (sensitization) to recently rewarded locations, increased total working memory errors and an increased propensity to search near previously rewarded locations. In Experiment 2, the extramaze cues were obscured and each pot was identified by a unique pattern. Under these conditions, mice with hippocampal lesions showed comparable working memory errors to control mice. However, lesioned mice continued to display increased perseverative responding and altered search strategies. Experiment 3 tested the hypothesis that age-related accumulation of amyloid would disrupt foraging behaviour in transgenic PDAPP mice expressing the V717F amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutation. Consistent with previous findings, PDAPP mice showed both age-dependent and age-independent behavioural changes. More specifically, 14–16 month-old PDAPP mice showed a deficit in perseverative responding and working memory errors. In contrast, changes in search behaviour, such as systematic circling, were present throughout development. The latter indicates that APP overexpression contributed to some features of the PDAPP behavioural phenotype, whereas working memory and flexible responding was sensitive to ageing and β-amyloid burden. In conclusion, the present study provided novel insight into the role of the hippocampus and the effects of APP overexpression on memory and search behaviour in an open-field foraging task.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Pharmacy
Psychology
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 1074-7427
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 5 February 2018
Date of Acceptance: 4 February 2018
Last Modified: 17 Oct 2019 21:11
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/108850

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