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Profiling biomarkers of traumatic axonal injury: from mouse to man

Mannivannan, Susruta, Makwana, Milan, Ahmed, Aminul Islam and Zaben, Malik 2018. Profiling biomarkers of traumatic axonal injury: from mouse to man. Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery 171 , pp. 6-20. 10.1016/j.clineuro.2018.05.017

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Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) poses a major public health problem on a global scale. Its burden results from high mortality and significant morbidity in survivors. This stems, in part, from an ongoing inadequacy in diagnostic and prognostic indicators despite significant technological advances. Traumatic axonal injury (TAI) is a key driver of the ongoing pathological process following TBI, causing chronic neurological deficits and disability. The science underpinning biomarkers of TAI has been a subject of many reviews in recent literature. However, in this review we provide a comprehensive account of biomarkers from animal models to clinical studies, bridging the gap between experimental science and clinical medicine. We have discussed pathogenesis, temporal kinetics, relationships to neuro-imaging, and, most importantly, clinical applicability in order to provide a holistic perspective of how this could improve TBI diagnosis and predict clinical outcome in a real-life setting. We conclude that early and reliable identification of axonal injury post-TBI with the help of body fluid biomarkers could enhance current care of TBI patients by (i) increasing speed and accuracy of diagnosis, (ii) providing invaluable prognostic information, (iii) allow efficient allocation of rehabilitation services, and (iv) provide potential therapeutic targets. The optimal model for assessing TAI is likely to involve multiple components, including several blood biomarkers and neuro-imaging modalities, at different time points.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute (NMHRI)
Medicine
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0303-8467
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 16 May 2018
Date of Acceptance: 14 May 2018
Last Modified: 22 Feb 2019 13:09
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/111506

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