Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Effect of low body temperature during unilateral labyrinthectomy on vestibular compensation in the guinea pig.

Ashton, JC, Gliddon, CM, Darlington, C and Smith, P 2003. Effect of low body temperature during unilateral labyrinthectomy on vestibular compensation in the guinea pig. Acta Oto-laryngologica 123 (4) , pp. 448-52. 10.1080/0036554021000028124

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Objectives - Vestibular compensation, the recovery that follows unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD), is a model for central nervous system plasticity. Recovery from the static symptoms of UVD may involve temperature-dependent processes that modulate the immediate effects of UVD and/or the capability of the central nervous system to undergo adaptive plasticity. In this study we investigated changes in oculomotor and postural vestibular symptoms resulting from low body temperature during UVD. Material and methods - To study the effect of low temperatures at the time of UVD on vestibular compensation, we compared the rate of compensation and peak values for postural [roll head tilt (RHT) and yaw head tilt (YHT)] and oculomotor [spontaneous nystagmus (SN)] symptoms in three groups of guinea pigs. Animals in Group 1 (n=6) were maintained at 38°C throughout unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL). Animals in Group 2 (n=6) were not temperature-controlled and animals in Group 3 (n=4) were cooled with ice to 25°C throughout UL. Results - Cooled animals showed significantly higher rates of SN upon recovery from anaesthesia and took a significantly longer time to compensate. Cooled animals were also slower to compensate for postural symptoms (RHT and YHT), with 2 animals showing no compensation for RHT 52 h after UL. Conclusion - Hypothermia (25°C) during UVD surgery exacerbates postural and oculomotor symptoms following UL and significantly slows recovery.

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Publisher: Taylor & Francis: STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Titles
ISSN: 0001-6489
Date of Acceptance: 1 July 2004
Last Modified: 09 Jul 2018 13:00
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/111971

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item