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Magnitude of the object recognition deficit associated with perirhinal cortex damage in rats: Effects of varying the lesion extent and the duration of the sample period

Albasser, Mathieu M., Davies, Moira, Futter, James Edward and Aggleton, John Patrick 2009. Magnitude of the object recognition deficit associated with perirhinal cortex damage in rats: Effects of varying the lesion extent and the duration of the sample period. Behavioral Neuroscience 123 (1) , pp. 115-124. 10.1037/a0013829

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Abstract

The present study examines 2 factors that might moderate the object-recognition deficit seen after perirhinal cortex damage. Object recognition by normal rats was improved by extending (from 4 to 8 min) the sample period during which an object was first explored. Furthermore, there was a significant positive correlation between time spent in close exploration of the sample object and degree of successful novelty discrimination. In contrast, rats with perirhinal cortex lesions failed to benefit from increased close exploration and did not discriminate the novel object after even the longest sample period. Nevertheless, the lesions did not disrupt habituation across repeated exposure to the same object. The second factor was extent of perirhinal cortex damage. A significant correlation was found between total perirhinal cortex loss and degree of recognition impairment. Within the perirhinal cortex, only damage to the caudal perirhinal cortex correlated significantly with recognition memory deficits. This study highlights the critical importance of the perirhinal cortex within the temporal lobe for recognition memory and shows that the lesion-induced deficit occurs despite seemingly normal levels of close object exploration.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Medicine
Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute (NMHRI)
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Publisher: American Psychological Association
ISSN: 0735-7044
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 02:42
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/11357

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