Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

The identification of novel single nucleotide polymorphisms to assist in mapping the spread of Bacillus anthracis across the Southern Caucasus

Sahin, Mitat, Buyuk, Fatih, Baillie, Les, Wölfel, Roman, Kotorashvili, Adam, Rehn, Alexandra, Antwerpen, Markus and Grass, Gregor 2018. The identification of novel single nucleotide polymorphisms to assist in mapping the spread of Bacillus anthracis across the Southern Caucasus. Scientific Reports 8 (1) , 11254. 10.1038/s41598-018-29738-3

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Anthrax is common as a zoonotic disease in the southern Caucasus area including parts of Turkey and Georgia. In this region, population genetics of the etiological agent Bacillus anthracis comprises, where known, the major canonical single nucleotide polymorphism (canSNP) groups A.Br.Aust94 and A.Br.008/009 of the pathogen’s global phylogeny, respectively. Previously, isolates of B. anthracis from Turkey have been genotyped predominantly by multi locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) or canSNP typing. While whole genome sequencing is the future gold standard, it is currently still costly. For that reason we were interested in identifying novel SNPs which could assist in further distinguishing closely related isolates using low cost assay platforms. In this study we sequenced the genomes of seven B. anthracis strains collected from the Kars province of Eastern Anatolia in Turkey and discovered new SNPs which allowed us to assign these and other geographically related strains to three novel branches of the major A-branch canSNP-group (A.Br.) Aust94. These new branches were named Kafkas-Geo 1–3 and comprised isolates from the Kars region and the neighboring republic of Georgia suggesting a common ancestry. The novel SNPs identified in this study connect the population genetics of B. anthracis in the South Caucasus and Turkey and will likely assist efforts to map the spread of the pathogen across this region.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Pharmacy
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
ISSN: 2045-2322
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 30 July 2018
Date of Acceptance: 17 July 2018
Last Modified: 30 Jul 2018 15:40
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/113717

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics