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The role of Ca 2+ in oocyte activation during In Vitro fertilization: Insights into potential therapies for rescuing failed fertilization

Swann, Karl 2018. The role of Ca 2+ in oocyte activation during In Vitro fertilization: Insights into potential therapies for rescuing failed fertilization. BBA - Molecular Cell Research 1865 (11) , pp. 1830-1837. 10.1016/j.bbamcr.2018.05.003

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Abstract

At fertilization the mature mammalian oocyte is activated to begin development by a sperm-induced series of increases in the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration. These so called Ca2+ oscillations, or repetitive Ca2+ spikes, are also seen after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and are primarily triggered by a sperm protein called phospholipase Czeta (PLCζ). Whilst ICSI is generally an effective way to fertilizing human oocytes, there are cases where oocyte activation fails to occur after sperm injection. Many such cases appear to be associated with a PLCζ deficiency. Some IVF clinics are now attempting to rescue such cases of failed fertilization by using artificial means of oocyte activation such as the application of Ca2+ ionophores. This review presents the scientific background for these therapies and also considers ways to improve artificial oocyte activation after failed fertilization.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Biosciences
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0167-4889
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 3 August 2018
Date of Acceptance: 2 May 2018
Last Modified: 29 Jun 2019 19:57
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/113882

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