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Visual impairments in macaques following inferior temporal lesions are exacerbated selectively by additional damage to superior temporal sulcus

Aggleton, John Patrick and Mishkin, M. 1990. Visual impairments in macaques following inferior temporal lesions are exacerbated selectively by additional damage to superior temporal sulcus. Behavioural Brain Research 39 (3) , pp. 262-274. 10.1016/0166-4328(90)90032-A

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Abstract

The present study examined the behavioural effects of removing the inferior temporal cortex (area TE) either on its own or in combination with the adjacent fundus and upper bank of the superior temporal sulcus (area STP). Comparisons with preoperative behaviour showed that the addition of superior temporal sulcal damage led to an increase in visual components of the Klfiver-Bucy syndrome, i.e. an increased tendency to touch and examine objects coupled with a decrease in emotional reactivity, but no excessive orality, changes in food preference, or coprophagia. No group differences were found in the learning of 3 pattern discriminations, but the animals with additional superior temporal sulcal lesions were more impaired than the others on 3 colour discriminations, successive reversals of an object discrimination, and a learning-set task. These findings indicate that STP provides an important route, independent of the route via TE, by which visual information can reach limbic structures to evoke affective responses and contribute to visual learning.

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Medicine
Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute (NMHRI)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Uncontrolled Keywords: inferior temporal cortex ; superior temporal sulcus ; amygdala ; Klüver-Bucy syndrome ; visual discrimination ; monkey.
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0166-4328
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 02:43
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/11451

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