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The impacts of motivational framing of technology restrictions on adolescent concealment: evidence from a preregistered experimental study

Weinstein, Netta and Przybylski, A 2019. The impacts of motivational framing of technology restrictions on adolescent concealment: evidence from a preregistered experimental study. Computers in Human Behavior 90 , pp. 170-180. 10.1016/j.chb.2018.08.053

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Abstract

Caregivers employ a range of motivational strategies to help regulate and protect adolescents using connective technologies. The present study explored a new conceptual model informed by self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000; Ryan & Deci, 2000) with a representative sample of 1,000 adolescents recruited nationwide within Britain, and using a confirmatory, pre-registered and open science methodology. In this experimental study we compared controlling (pressuring, coercive, or punitive) styles of restricting technology with neutral, and autonomy-supportive (empathic, choice-promoting) styles of restricting to predict adolescents’ concealing their technology use from caregivers. We further tested two mechanisms which might explain the links of condition and concealment: perceiving caregivers to be trusting, and experiencing reactance or the desire to do the opposite of what was instructed. Findings are discussed in terms of the role of regulation styles on interpersonal outcomes and adolescent development, and implications for technology use policy and recommendations to caregivers and teachers.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0747-5632
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 3 September 2018
Date of Acceptance: 28 August 2018
Last Modified: 17 Oct 2019 12:37
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/114550

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