Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Concurrent TMS-fMRI reveals dynamic interhemispheric influences of the right parietal cortex during exogenously cued visuospatial attention

Heinen, Klaartje, Ruff, Christian C., Bjoertomt, Otto, Schenkluhn, Bertram, Bestmann, Sven, Blankenburg, Felix, Driver, Jon and Chambers, Christopher D. 2011. Concurrent TMS-fMRI reveals dynamic interhemispheric influences of the right parietal cortex during exogenously cued visuospatial attention. European Journal of Neuroscience 33 (5) , pp. 991-1000. 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2010.07580.x

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

We used concurrent transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional MRI (TMS-fMRI) during a visuospatial cueing paradigm in humans, to study the causal role of the right angular gyrus (AG) as a source of attentional control. Our findings show that TMS over the right AG (high vs. low intensity) modulates neural responses interhemispherically, in a manner that varies dynamically with the current attentional condition. The behavioural impact of such TMS depended not only on the target hemifield but also on exogenous cue validity, facilitating spatial reorienting to invalidly cued right visual targets. On a neural level, right AG TMS had corresponding interhemispheric effects in the left AG and left retinotopic cortex, including area V1. We conclude that the direction of covert visuospatial attention can involve dynamic interplay between the right AG and remote interconnected regions of the opposite left hemisphere, whereas our findings also suggest that the right AG can influence responses in the retinotopic visual cortex.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre (CUBRIC)
Psychology
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Uncontrolled Keywords: Angular gyrus ; Functional magnetic resonance imaging ; Humans ; Reorienting ; Transcranial magnetic stimulation ; Visual attention
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN: 0953-816X
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 02:44
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/11510

Citation Data

Cited 37 times in Google Scholar. View in Google Scholar

Cited 36 times in Scopus. View in Scopus. Powered By Scopus® Data

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item