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Modelling and practical set-up to investigate the performance of permanent magnet synchronous motor through rotor position estimation at zero and low speeds

Al Ibraheemi, Mazen 2018. Modelling and practical set-up to investigate the performance of permanent magnet synchronous motor through rotor position estimation at zero and low speeds. PhD Thesis, Cardiff Unvieristy.
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Abstract

This thesis provides a study for the rotor position estimation in SM-PMSMs, particularly at zero and low speeds. The method for zero rotor speed is based on injection of three high frequency voltage pulses in the motor stator windings. Then, the voltage responses at the motor terminals are exploited to extract the rotor position. Two approaches, modelling and practical implementations, are presented. The obtained results have showed a verification of a high-resolution position estimation (a position estimation of 1 degree angle), a simplicity and cost effective implementation and a no need for current sensors is required to achieve the estimation process. It should be noticed that the implementation of rotor position estimation at zero speed is only attended when the rotor is at standstill or very low speed. Therefore, the motor driver is not expected to be active at this condition. Thereby, the zero speed estimation does not provide a robust torque control. In future, this should be taking into consideration to overcome this drawback and to make the estimator more reliable. At low speed running, the primary goal is to start spinning the under test motors, and then the rotor position estimation is achieved. The motor spinning is based on adopting a virtual injected signal to generate the voltage components, Vα and Vβ, of the space vector pulse width modulation technique. Then, generating the eight space vectors is conducted through storing the standard patterns of the six space vector sectors in a memory structure together with the timing sequences of each sector. The presented strategy of motor running includes a proposed motor speed control scheme, which is based on controlling the frequency of the power signal, at the inverter output, through controlling the timing period of execution the power delivery program. The thesis presents a proposed method to achieve the estimation goal depends on tracking the magnetic saliency on one motor line voltage. Thereby, the rotor position estimation The introduced proposed method, for rotor position estimation at zero speed, verifies the following contributions:  Presents a simple and cost effective zero speed rotor position estimator for the motor under test.  The aimed resolution in this thesis is an angle 1 degree. IV  Adopting solely the measuring of motor terminal voltages.  Eliminating the detection of the rotor magnet polarity as a necessary technique for completing the position estimation. At low speed running, the following contributions are verified:  Rather than a real frequency signal, a virtual injected signal is adopted to generate the voltage components, Vα and Vβ of the space vector pulse width modulation technique.  The proposed method for generating the eight space vectors is based on storing the standard patterns of the six sectors in a memory structure together with the timing sequence.  The strategy of motor speed control is based on controlling the period of execution the power delivery program.  The strategy of low speed rotor position employs one motor line voltage from which the low speed estimation is achieved.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Date Type: Submission
Status: Unpublished
Schools: Engineering
Uncontrolled Keywords: Permanent Magnets Motor; Rotor Position Estimation; Pulse Injection; AVPWM; Saliency; Voltage Responses.
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 9 October 2018
Last Modified: 09 Oct 2018 09:07
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/115646

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