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Polarized macrophages have distinct roles in the differentiation and migration of embryonic spinal-cord-derived neural stem cells after grafting to injured sites of spinal cord

Zhang, Kun, Zheng, Jingjing, Bian, Ganlan, Liu, Ling, Xue, Qian, Liu, Fangfang, Yu, Caiyong, Zhang, Haifeng, Song, Bing, Chung, Sookja K, Ju, Gong and Wang, Jian 2015. Polarized macrophages have distinct roles in the differentiation and migration of embryonic spinal-cord-derived neural stem cells after grafting to injured sites of spinal cord. Molecular Therapy 23 (6) , pp. 1077-1091. 10.1038/mt.2015.46

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Abstract

Spinal cord injury (SCI) frequently provokes serious detrimental outcomes because neuronal regeneration is limited in the central nervous system (CNS). Thus, the creation of a permissive environment for transplantation therapy with neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) is a promising strategy to replace lost neuronal cells, promote repair, and stimulate functional plasticity after SCI. Macrophages are important SCI-associated inflammatory cells and a major source of secreted factors that modify the lesion milieu. Here, we used conditional medium (CM) from bone marrow-derived M1 or M2 polarized macrophages to culture murine NS/PCs. The NS/PCs showed enhanced astrocytic versus neuronal/oligodendrocytic differentiation in the presence of M1- versus M2-CM. Similarly, cotransplantation of NS/PCs with M1 and M2 macrophages into intact or injured murine spinal cord increased the number of engrafted NS/PC-derived astrocytes and neurons/oligodendrocytes, respectively. Furthermore, when cotransplantated with M2 macrophages, the NS/PC-derived neurons integrated into the local circuitry and enhanced locomotor recovery following SCI. Interesting, engrafted M1 macrophages promoted long-distance rostral migration of NS/PC-derived cells in a chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4)-dependent manner, while engrafted M2 macrophages resulted in limited cell migration of NS/PC-derived cells. Altogether, these findings suggest that the cotransplantation of NS/PCs together with polarized macrophages could constitute a promising therapeutic approach for SCI repair.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Dentistry
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
ISSN: 1525-0016
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 23 October 2018
Date of Acceptance: 4 March 2015
Last Modified: 22 Aug 2019 12:23
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/116064

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