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Concussion assessment in the Emergency Department: A preliminary study for a quality improvement project

Mistry, Dylan A. and Rainer, Timothy H 2018. Concussion assessment in the Emergency Department: A preliminary study for a quality improvement project. BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine 4 (1) , e000445. 10.1136/bmjsem-2018-000445

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Abstract

Background In sport, concussion is assessed using the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) 5 and managed with return to play guidelines. Similar, user-friendly tools are rarely, if ever, used in the emergency department (ED). Objectives To evaluate a modified concussion assessment tool designed for the ED (ED-CAT) in patients presenting with a head injury and to identify variables that predict 30-day reattendance. Methods A preliminary, prospective, evaluation in a quality improvement project was conducted in one hospital in South Wales. Patients were recruited if they were over 13 years, and either did not have an ED-CT head scan or had a scan with no acute changes. The primary outcome was 30-day reattendance. Results 40 patients were recruited, 18 of whom had a CT scan. 37 were discharged on the same day with advice, two discharged the next day and one was admitted. Three (7.5%) patients reattended the department. Predictors of reattendance were headache score (median 3.0 vs 5.0; p<0.05), pressure in head score (2.0 vs 5.0; p<0.05), nausea/vomiting score (1.0 vs 3.0; p<0.05), dizziness score (1.0 vs 4.0; p<0.05), blurred vision score (0 vs 4.0; p<0.01), balance problems score (0 vs 4.0; p<0.05), sensitivity to light and confusion score (0 vs 4.0; p<0.01), orientation score (1. 0 vs 0; p<0.05) and immediate memory score (5.0 vs 4.0; p<0.05). Conclusions Key symptoms and signs predicted 30-day reattendance. The ED-CAT requires validation and refinement in a larger population to produce a short, practical, user-friendly, relevant tool for ED head injury assessment.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Published Online
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN: 2055-7647
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 15 November 2018
Date of Acceptance: 15 November 2018
Last Modified: 26 Feb 2019 09:28
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/116817

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