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Identification of common genetic risk variants for autism spectrum disorder

Grove, Jakob, Ripke, Stephan, Als, Thomas D., Mattheisen, Manuel, Walters, Raymond, Won, Hyejung, Pallesen, Jonatan, Agerbo, Esben, Andreassen, Ole A., Anney, Richard, Belliveau, Rich, Bettella, Francesco, Buxbaum, Joseph D., Bybjerg-Grauholm, Jonas, B?kved-Hansen, Marie, Cerrato, Felecia, Chambert, Kimberly, Christensen, Jane H., Churchhouse, Claire, Dellenvall, Karin, Demontis, Ditte, Rubeis, Silvia De, Devlin, Bernie, Djurovic, Srdjan, Dumont, Ashle, Goldstein, Jacqueline, Hansen, Christine S., Hauberg, Mads Engel, Hollegaard, Mads V., Hope, Sigrun, Howrigan, Daniel P., Huang, Hailiang, Hultman, Christina, Klei, Lambertus, Maller, Julian, Martin, Joanna, Martin, Alicia R., Moran, Jennifer, Robinson, Elise B., Roeder, Kathryn, Roussos, Panos, Saemundsen, Evald, Sandin, Sven, Satterstrom, F. Kyle, Smith, George Davey, Stefansson, Hreinn, Stefansson, Kari, Steinberg, Stacy, Stevens, Christine, Sullivan, Patrick F, Turley, Patrick, Walters, G. Bragi, Xu, Xinyi, Nordentoft, Merete, Hougaard, David M., Werge, Thomas, Mors, Ole, Mortensen, Preben Bo, Neale, Benjamin M., Daly, Mark J. and Brglum, Anders D. 2019. Identification of common genetic risk variants for autism spectrum disorder. Nature Genetics 51 , pp. 431-444. 10.1038/s41588-019-0344-8

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Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a highly heritable and heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental phenotypes diagnosed in more than 1% of children. Common genetic variants contribute substantially to ASD susceptibility, but to date no individual variants have been robustly associated with ASD. With a marked sample size increase from a unique Danish population resource, we report a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 18,381 ASD cases and 27,969 controls that identifies five genome-wide significant loci. Leveraging GWAS results from three phenotypes with significantly overlapping genetic architectures (schizophrenia, major depression, and educational attainment), seven additional loci shared with other traits are identified at equally strict significance levels. Dissecting the polygenic architecture we find both quantitative and qualitative polygenic heterogeneity across ASD subtypes, in contrast to what is typically seen in other complex disorders. These results highlight biological insights, particularly relating to neuronal function and corticogenesis and establish that GWAS performed at scale will be much more productive in the near term in ASD, just as it has been in a broad range of important psychiatric and diverse medical phenotypes.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics (CNGG)
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
ISSN: 1061-4036
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 20 December 2018
Date of Acceptance: 12 December 2018
Last Modified: 25 Aug 2019 02:28
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/117868

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Cited 6 times in Scopus. View in Scopus. Powered By Scopus® Data

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