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The global south in environmental negotiations: the politics of coalitions INREDD+

Allan, Jen Iris and Dauvergne, Peter 2013. The global south in environmental negotiations: the politics of coalitions INREDD+. Third World Quarterly 34 (8) , pp. 1307-1322. 10.1080/01436597.2013.831536

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Abstract

During international environmental negotiations developing countries have commonly employed a unified strategy through the G-77 and China (G-77/China). Compared with other negotiations, such as those on trade and security, this strategy has been relatively successful in securing financial and technical benefits. Unity among developing states is not, however, a characteristic of all environmental negotiations. This paper analyses the case of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation plus conservation ( redd +), where unity has been absent. It argues that the negotiation positions, strategies and coalition politics from 2005 to 2013 have been a result of identifiable power asymmetries among developing states (shifting over time). Some states with vast forest resources have held an effective veto, while others have had considerable moral influence and expert authority. Coalitions have courted such relevant and reputational leaders. At the same time some developing states have had enough diplomatic capacity and economic power to stand alone in negotiations. Taking a broad, historical view of the diverse forest interests and power asymmetries among developing states helps to explain the recent stagnation in negotiations to establish an international redd+ mechanism to mitigate climate change.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Department of Politics and International Relations (POLIR)
Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge): SSH Titles
ISSN: 0143-6597
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2019 14:50
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/119251

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