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Complex caring trajectories in community mental health: contingencies, divisions of labor and care coordination

Hannigan, Ben and Allen, Davina Ann 2013. Complex caring trajectories in community mental health: contingencies, divisions of labor and care coordination. Community Mental Health Journal 49 (4) , pp. 380-388. 10.1007/s10597-011-9467-9

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Abstract

The concept of ‘trajectory’ refers to the unfolding of individual service users’ health and illness experiences, the organization of health and social care work surrounding them and the impact this work has on people involved. Using qualitative data from a study completed in two sites in Wales we first reveal the complex character of trajectories encountered in the community mental health field. We show how these can be shaped by features peculiar to mental ill-health per se, and by features with organizational origins. We then use our data to lay bare true divisions of labor. Mental health professionals featured prominently in our study. We also reveal relatively invisible contributions made by professionals on the periphery, support workers, unpaid lay carers and service users. In examining the significance of our findings we identify particular lessons for mental health practitioners, managers and policymakers sharing concerns for the coordination of care.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Healthcare Sciences
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Uncontrolled Keywords: Care coordination ; Mental health systems ; Roles; trajectories ; UK ; Work
Publisher: Springer Verlag
ISSN: 0010-3853
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 02:47
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/12063

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