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Ecosystem services: A bridge or barrier for UK marine stakeholders?

McKinley, Emma, Pagès, Jordi F., Wyles, Kayleigh J. and Beaumont, Nicola 2019. Ecosystem services: A bridge or barrier for UK marine stakeholders? Ecosystem Services 37 , -. 10.1016/j.ecoser.2019.100922
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Abstract

Ecosystem services conceptualises the multiple interactions between ecosystems and the people and communities benefitting from their direct or indirect use, aiming to provide stakeholders and scientists with a common language. While some users appear to have adopted this language and terminology, there are concerns that the complexities associated with the concept make it inaccessible and, rather than providing stakeholders with a tool to explain complex relationships, the language and terminology itself may disengage. Through surveying UK-based coastal and marine stakeholders (n = 158), this study examines stakeholders’ perceptions of the concept of ecosystem services and its role and usefulness within the marine and coastal science-policy-practice interface. Overall, stakeholders provided favourable opinions, with findings similar across respondents with the exception of industry; which used it less, was less confident with it and believed it to be less important. The results provide an evidenced argument for the benefits of the ecosystem services approach, including communication, supporting management and linking environment to humans. The analysis also details the required advancements to ensure effective future use, including improved terminology, pluralistic valuation and shared learning. Finally, the paper highlights challenges and benefits relating to the term, creating links to ongoing discussions about effective scientific communication for marine and coastal management.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Earth and Ocean Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 2212-0416
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 12 April 2019
Date of Acceptance: 25 March 2019
Last Modified: 15 Apr 2019 10:15
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/121755

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