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How do we assess the quality of group supervision? Developing a coding framework

Bostock, Lisa, Patrizo, Louis, Godfrey, Tessa, Munro, Emily and Forrester, Donald 2019. How do we assess the quality of group supervision? Developing a coding framework. Children and Youth Services Review 100 , pp. 515-524. 10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.027
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Abstract

The importance of supervision for social work practice is one of the most widely accepted tenets of the profession. Yet, surprisingly little is known about what happens in supervision, making it difficult to unravel what it is about supervision that makes a difference to social work practice. This paper describes the development of a framework for assessing the quality of group supervision. It focuses on one sub-category of group supervision – systemic group supervision – and draws a wider evaluation of systemic social work practice in the UK. It is based on 29 observations of “live” of supervision to illustrate differences in quality of supervisory practice. The process of developing the coding framework was cyclical, and ultimately resulted in a three-point ordinal grouping for assessing systemic supervisory practice. Analysis of observational data assessed systemic group supervision as follows: 8 as non-systemic (28%); 12 (41%) as demonstrating some incorporation of systemic ideas into interactions, described as “green shoots” (or showing encouraging signs of development but not yet reached its full potential); and 9 (31%) supervision sessions demonstrating a full incorporation of systemic concepts and practice. What marked “systemic” sessions from “green shoots” supervision was the move from hypothesis generation about family relations and risk to children to purposeful, actionable conversations with families: the move from reflection to action. This paper supports a small but growing body of evidence about the fundamental characteristics of successful or effective supervision within children and families social work.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Social Sciences (Includes Criminology and Education)
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0190-7409
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 23 May 2019
Date of Acceptance: 13 March 2019
Last Modified: 23 May 2019 09:31
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/121789

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