Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Different origins of seafloor undulations in a submarine canyon system, northern South China Sea, based on their seismic character and relative location

Li, Jian, Li, Wei, Alves, Tiago M., Rebesco, Michele, Zhan, Wenhuan, Sun, Jie, Mitchell, Neil C. and Wu, Shiguo 2019. Different origins of seafloor undulations in a submarine canyon system, northern South China Sea, based on their seismic character and relative location. Marine Geology 413 , pp. 99-111. 10.1016/j.margeo.2019.04.007
Item availability restricted.

[img] PDF - Accepted Post-Print Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 19 April 2020 due to copyright restrictions.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (3MB)

Abstract

High-resolution 2D and 3D seismic data are used to investigate the morphology, internal architecture and origin of widespread seafloor undulations in the eastern area of a submarine canyon system, northern South China Sea. The seafloor undulations reveal similar seafloor morphologies, and three different types (Types A, B and C) can be classified based on their relative locations and internal seismic characters. Types A and B are observed in the canyon areas, whereas Type C occurs in the canyon heads. Seismic reflections within Types A and C are continuous and have an upslope migrating trend, while Type B seafloor undulations are separated by listric faults. Our analysis reveals the origins of these three different types of seafloor undulations. Type A seafloor undulations are sediment waves formed by turbidity currents flowing through the submarine canyons. Gravity-driven submarine creep resulted in the formation of Type B seafloor undulations. Type C undulations are sediment waves generated by internal waves interacting with the continental slope. Our results provide information about the origin of widespread seafloor undulations in other submarine canyon systems. It is also of great significance to future risk assessments, as the study area now is one of the most active regions for hydrocarbon exploration in SE Asia.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Earth and Ocean Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0025-3227
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 10 May 2019
Date of Acceptance: 13 April 2019
Last Modified: 13 May 2019 10:45
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/122334

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

View more statistics