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Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in human-derived and foodchain-derived samples from England, Wales, and Scotland: an epidemiological surveillance and typing study

Day, Michaela J., Hopkins, Katie L., Wareham, David W., Toleman, Mark A., Elviss, Nicola, Randall, Luke, Teale, Christopher, Cleary, Paul, Wiuff, Camilla, Doumith, Michel, Elington, Matthew J., Woodford, Neil and Livermore, David M. 2019. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in human-derived and foodchain-derived samples from England, Wales, and Scotland: an epidemiological surveillance and typing study. Lancet Infectious Diseases 19 (12) , pp. 1325-1335. 10.1016/S1473-3099(19)30273-7

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Abstract

BackgroundExtended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolates (ESBL-E coli) cause more than 5000 cases of bacteraemias annually in the UK. The contribution of the food chain to these infections is debated. We aimed to identify the most important reservoirs of ESBL-E coli that colonise and infect humans to identify strategic intervention points.MethodsSampling for ESBL-E coli was done between Aug 1, 2013, and Dec 15, 2014. We used selective media to seek ESBL-E coli in routinely submitted samples from human faeces, and prospectively collected samples from sewage, farm slurry, and retail foodstuffs in London, East Anglia, northwest England, Scotland, and Wales. We sequenced recovered isolates and compared these isolates with 293 bloodstream and 83 veterinary surveillance ESBL-E coli isolates from the same regions.Findings2157 (11%) of 20 243 human faeces samples contained ESBL-E coli, including 678 (17%) of 3995 in London. ESBL-E coli also were frequent in sewage and retail chicken (104 [65%] of 159 meat samples), but were rare in other meats and absent from plant-based foods (0 of 400 fruit and vegetable samples). Sequence type (ST) 131 dominated among ESBL-E coli from human blood (188 [64%] of 293 isolates), faeces (128 [36%] of 360), and sewage (14 [22%] of 65) with STs 38 and 648 also widespread; CTX-M-15 was the predominant ESBL in these lineages (319 [77%] of 416). By contrast, STs 602, 23, and 117—mostly with CTX-M-1 ESBL—dominated among food and veterinary isolates (68 [31%] of 218), with only two ST131 organisms recovered. ST10 occurred in both animals and humans, being frequent in surveillance bovines (11 [22%] of 51 cattle) and representing 15 (4%) of 360 human faecal isolates (but only three [1%] of 293 from bacteraemias); however, both human and animal ST10 isolates were diverse in serotype.InterpretationMost human bacteraemias with ESBL-E coli in the UK involve internationally prevalent human-associated STs, particularly ST131; non-human reservoirs made little contribution to invasive human disease. Any interventions that seek to target food or livestock can affect the numbers of human infections caused by ESBL-E coli; prevention of the spread of resistant lineages among humans is more vital.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Publisher: Elsevier: Lancet
ISSN: 1473-3099
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 30 May 2019
Date of Acceptance: 21 May 2019
Last Modified: 15 Jun 2020 08:30
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/122975

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