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Wounds and mental health care: System thinking

Samuriwo, Raymond and Hannigan, Ben 2019. Wounds and mental health care: System thinking. Mental Health Review Journal 10.1108/MHRJ-03-2019-0007

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Abstract

This paper considers how the quality of wound care delivered to people experiencing mental ill health can be improved at system level in line with the global focus on improving population health. The objectives of this paper is to identify how the quality of wound care delivered to mental health care service users can be improved at a population level through system thinking informed by boundary theory Critical analysis of practice underpinned by systems thinking and boundary theory Tissue viability care and mental health care have different professional cultures and identities which are manifest in the way that they are organised and delivered. If improvements in wound care-related outcomes at a population level are to be achieved, then it is important that the wound care needs of people experiencing mental ill health are addressed. Systems thinking and boundary theory provide a useful conceptual framework for informing quality improvement for people experiencing mental ill health at a population level. Integrated care plans provide a useful mechanism for delivering comprehensive care that brings about wound healing and recovery from mental ill health. • There has been a focus on improving many aspects of wound care in line with the global focus on grand convergence in population health, but there has been very little emphasis on improving the wound related outcomes of people that use mental health services • Systems thinking and boundary theory provide a useful framework for understanding how wound care for people experiencing mental ill health can be improved at a population level • Integrated care plans are a useful way of ensuring that safe high quality wound care is consistently delivered to people experiencing mental ill health

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Published Online
Status: In Press
Schools: Healthcare Sciences
Publisher: Emerald
ISSN: 1361-9322
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 17 August 2019
Date of Acceptance: 17 August 2019
Last Modified: 18 Oct 2019 17:34
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/124987

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