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Oxygen uptake and antioxidant responses of the free-living diplomonad Hexamita sp.

Biagini, G A, Suller, M T, Finlay, B J and Lloyd, D 1997. Oxygen uptake and antioxidant responses of the free-living diplomonad Hexamita sp. Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology 44 (5) , 447--453. 10.1111/j.1550-7408.1997.tb05722.x

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Abstract

The free-living anaerobic flagellate Hexamita sp. was observed to actively consume O2 with a K(m) O2 of 13 microM. Oxygen consumption increased linearly with O2 tension up to a threshold level of 100 microM, above which it was inhibited. Oxygen uptake was supported by a number of substrates but probably not coupled to energy conservation as cytochromes could not be detected spectro-photometrically. In addition, inhibitors specific for respiratory chain components did not significantly affect O2 uptake. Respiration was however, partially inhibited by flavoprotein and iron-sulfur protein inhibitors. NAD(P)H supported O2 consumption was measured in both particulate and soluble fractions; this activity was partially inhibited by quinacrine. A chemosensory response was observed in cells exposed to air, however no response was observed in the presence of superoxide dismutase plus catalase. Catalase and nonspecific peroxidase activity could not be detected, but superoxide dismutase plus catalase. Catalase and nonspecific peroxidase activity could not be detected, but superoxide dismutase activity was present. Superoxide dismutase was sensitive to NaN3, and H2O2 but not KCN, suggesting a Fe prosthetic group. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that thiol levels in live cells were depleted in the presence of t-butyl H2O2. The observed NADPH-driven glutathione reductase activity is believed to recycle oxidized thiols in order to re-establish reduced thiol levels in the cell. The corresponding thiol cycling enzyme glutathione peroxidase could not be detected. The ability to withstand high O2 tensions (100 microM) would enable Hexamita to spend short periods in a wider range of habitats. Prolonged exposure to O2 tensions higher than 100 microM leads to irreversible damage and cell death.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Biosciences
Publisher: Wiley
ISSN: 1066-5234
Date of Acceptance: 4 May 1997
Last Modified: 04 Mar 2020 17:00
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/127714

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