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Surface and deep ocean interactions during the cold climate event 8,200 years ago

Ellison, Christopher R. W., Chapman, Mark R. and Hall, Ian Robert 2006. Surface and deep ocean interactions during the cold climate event 8,200 years ago. Science 312 (5782) , pp. 1929-1932. 10.1126/science.1127213

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Abstract

Evidence from a North Atlantic deep-sea sediment core reveals that the largest climatic perturbation in our present interglacial, the 8200-year event, is marked by two distinct cooling events in the subpolar North Atlantic at 8490 and 8290 years ago. An associated reduction in deep flow speed provides evidence of a significant change to a major downwelling limb of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. The existence of a distinct surface freshening signal during these events strongly suggests that the sequenced surface and deep ocean changes were forced by pulsed meltwater outbursts from a multistep final drainage of the proglacial lakes associated with the decaying Laurentide Ice Sheet margin.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Earth and Ocean Sciences
Subjects: Q Science > QE Geology
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
ISSN: 00368075
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 01:39
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/1290

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Cited 153 times in Web of Science. View in Web of Science.

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