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An iterative ICA-based reconstruction method to produce consistent time-variable total water storage fields using GRACE and swarm satellite data

Forootan, Ehsan, Schumacher, Maike, Mehrnegar, Nooshin, Bezděk, Aleš, Talpe, Matthieu J., Farzaneh, Saeed, Zhang, Chaoyang, Zhang, Yu and Shum, C. K. 2020. An iterative ICA-based reconstruction method to produce consistent time-variable total water storage fields using GRACE and swarm satellite data. Remote Sensing 12 (10) , 1639. 10.3390/rs12101639

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Abstract

Observing global terrestrial water storage changes (TWSCs) from (inter-)seasonal to (multi-)decade time-scales is very important to understand the Earth as a system under natural and anthropogenic climate change. The primary goal of the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission (2002–2017) and its follow-on mission (GRACE-FO, 2018–onward) is to provide time-variable gravity fields, which can be converted to TWSCs with ∼300 km spatial resolution; however, the one year data gap between GRACE and GRACE-FO represents a critical discontinuity, which cannot be replaced by alternative data or model with the same quality. To fill this gap, we applied time-variable gravity fields (2013–onward) from the Swarm Earth explorer mission with low spatial resolution of ∼1500 km. A novel iterative reconstruction approach was formulated based on the independent component analysis (ICA) that combines the GRACE and Swarm fields. The reconstructed TWSC fields of 2003–2018 were compared with a commonly applied reconstruction technique and GRACE-FO TWSC fields, whose results indicate a considerable noise reduction and long-term consistency improvement of the iterative ICA reconstruction technique. They were applied to evaluate trends and seasonal mass changes (of 2003–2018) within the world’s 33 largest river basins

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Earth and Ocean Sciences
Publisher: MDPI
ISSN: 2072-4292
Funders: DAAD
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 29 May 2020
Date of Acceptance: 14 May 2020
Last Modified: 01 Jun 2020 10:30
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/131969

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