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CALL ME DAUGHTER: A collection of poems and a critical examination of southern ambivalence and the adult child voice in contemporary southern poetry

Collins, Christina Catherine 2020. CALL ME DAUGHTER: A collection of poems and a critical examination of southern ambivalence and the adult child voice in contemporary southern poetry. PhD Thesis, Cardiff University.
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Abstract

“Call Me Daughter: A Collection of Poems and a Critical Examination of Southern Ambivalence and the Adult Child Voice in Contemporary Southern Poetry” is a practice-led critical and creative writing PhD thesis in two parts: a collection of poems, titled Call Me Daughter, and a critical commentary that precedes the poems. The critical commentary, consisting of six chapters, explores two significant literary concepts relevant to the book of poems: Southern Ambivalence and the Adult Child Voice. The critical commentary uses Hamilton and Jaaniste’s “connective model” to define, contextualize, and analyze the two concepts in relation to both the wider field of Southern literature and my own poems, contextualizing the collection of poems as a new addition to an existing, if presently under researched, milieu – contemporary Southern poetry by women. In attempting to fill the gap in research on Southern women poets, two chapters in the critical commentary put forth readings of poems by Natasha Trethewey, Kathryn Stripling Byer, Linda Parsons, Ava Leavell Haymon, situating the commentary as an original contribution to knowledge. The collection of poems includes three sections. The first and the third sections include autobiographical poems based on my experience of being a Southern daughter. The second section, composed of a series of centos, explores a wider scope of Southern womanhood and daughterhood as experienced by ten well-known Southern women writers.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Date Type: Completion
Status: Unpublished
Schools: English, Communication and Philosophy
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 16 October 2020
Last Modified: 16 Oct 2020 09:56
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/135668

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