Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Imprinted genes and mental dysfunction

Davies, William, Isles, Anthony Roger and Wilkinson, Lawrence Stephen 2001. Imprinted genes and mental dysfunction. Annals of Medicine 33 (6) , pp. 428-436. 10.3109/07853890108995956

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

There is a rapidly accumulating body of evidence from family, adoption and twin studies suggestive of a genetic component to many common mental disorders. In some cases, the transmission of abnormalities has been shown to be dependent upon the sex of the parent from whom they are inherited. Such ‘parent-of-origin effects’ may be explained by a number of genetic mechanisms, one of which is ‘genomic imprinting’. In imprinted genes one allele is silenced according to its parental origin. This in turn means that imprinted traits are passed down the maternal or paternal line, in contrast to the more frequent Mendelian mode of inheritance that is indifferent to the parental origin of the allele. In the present review, we survey the evidence for the influence of imprinted genes on a number of mental disorders, ranging from explicit imprinted conditions, where in some cases abnormalities have been mapped to particular gene candidates, to examples where the evidence for parent-of-origin effects is less strong. We also consider, briefly, the wider implications of imprinted effects on mental dysfunction, in particular with respect to evolutionary pressures on mammalian brain development and function.

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Medicine
MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics (CNGG)
Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute (NMHRI)
Uncontrolled Keywords: genes; imprinting; mental disorders; parent-of-origin effects
Publisher: Informa Healthcare
ISSN: 0785-3890
Last Modified: 24 Apr 2019 13:47
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/13786

Citation Data

Cited 80 times in Google Scholar. View in Google Scholar

Cited 43 times in Scopus. View in Scopus. Powered By Scopus® Data

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item