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Cold atmospheric pressure gas plasma enhances the wear performance of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene

Perni, Stefano, Kong, Michael G. and Prokopovich, Polina 2012. Cold atmospheric pressure gas plasma enhances the wear performance of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Acta Biomaterialia 8 (3) , pp. 1357-1365. 10.1016/j.actbio.2011.12.007

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Abstract

Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is frequently employed in joint replacements because of its high biocompatibility; however, this material does not exhibit particularly strong wear performance, thus potentially reducing the longevity of such devices. Numerous techniques have been investigated to increase the resistance to wear of UHMWPE, but they are all based on expensive machinery and require a high level of safety precautions. Cold atmospheric pressure gas plasma treatment is an inexpensive process that has been used as a surface modification method and as a sterilization technique. We demonstrate for the first time that a helium/oxygen cold atmospheric pressure gas plasma can be used to enhance the wear performance of UHMWPE without affecting the cytocompatibility of the material. The exposure to a cold atmospheric pressure gas plasma results in a greater level of crosslinking of the polyethylene chains. As a consequence of the higher crosslinking, the material stiffness of the treated surface is increased.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Engineering
Pharmacy
Subjects: R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
Uncontrolled Keywords: cold atmospheric pressure gas plasma; total joint and disc arthroplasty; ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene; wear simulation; biomaterial modification
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 1742-7061
Last Modified: 10 Nov 2017 13:53
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/14670

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