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Pedal Power Pilot Study: Work in Progress - Preliminary Findings - Does participation in adapted dynamic cycling affect lower limb muscle function, activity levels and quality of life for children with Cerebral Palsy?

Pickering, Dawn and Horrocks, Lyn 2011. Pedal Power Pilot Study: Work in Progress - Preliminary Findings - Does participation in adapted dynamic cycling affect lower limb muscle function, activity levels and quality of life for children with Cerebral Palsy? Presented at: Society for Rehabilitation Research (SRR) Winter Meeting, Cardiff University, Wales, UK, 22 February 2011.

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Abstract

Pedal Power Pilot Study: Preliminary Findings Does participation in adapted dynamic cycling affect lower limb muscle function, activity levels and quality of life for children with Cerebral Palsy? Background: Children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) have limited opportunities for physical activity and participation due to impairments with balance and coordination. Adapted Dynamic Cycling (ADC) is one such activity that offers children with CP a recreational activity. Methods: A mixed methodology was used of physical measurements and interviews. The qualitative data is reported here. Two semi structured interviews were carried out with 17 parents and children at the beginning and end of 6 ADC sessions. Data was collected by Dictaphone/Video with an appropriate adult present to assist with the variety of communication styles used by the children. A cycling diary was kept and was referred to in the second interview. This data was transcribed and verified and is currently being analysed by open coding for themes. 88 Results: The coding of themes is being triangulated with other researchers to check for accuracy. The data demonstrates some facilitators and barriers to adapted dynamic cycling. ADC enabled children with CP to play and explore beyond their previous experience. These socially constructed stories provide greater understanding of the experiences of ADC for children with CP. Discussion: Some children showed remarkable achievements in cycling skills, endurance and social development. Despite some barriers, the experience of ADC for children with CP increased their potential for participation. Wider access to ADC needs further exploration. Conclusion: The current focus of rehabilitation needs to develop to enhance the participation of children with CP in appropriate activities that promotes their health and social independence and provide them with the opportunity for outstanding personal achievements.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)
Date Type: Completion
Status: Published
Schools: Healthcare Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
Last Modified: 17 Jul 2019 01:53
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/15283

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