Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Bespoke Human Hypertrophic Chondrocytic Cell Lines Provide the Osteoinductive Signals Required for Vascularized Bone Formation

Stringer, Bradley, Waddington, Rachel J., Sloan, Alastair James, Phillips, Ian, Telford, Gary, Hughes, David, Craig, Geoffrey, Gangemi, Lavinia, Brook, Ian, Freeman, Christine, Cao, Xuesong, Gosal, Mandeep, Smith, Simon, Russell, Graham and Foster, George A. 2007. Bespoke Human Hypertrophic Chondrocytic Cell Lines Provide the Osteoinductive Signals Required for Vascularized Bone Formation. Tissue Engineering 13 (1) , pp. 133-145. 10.1089/ten.2006.0111

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Hypertrophic cartilage provides themorphological and biochemical template for orchestrating bone growth. To produce a bone-inductive material such as hypertrophic cartilage for clinical use, we have conditionally immortalized hypertrophic chondrocytic cells fromhuman femur and expanded them in vitro through more than 145 divisions. The clonal cell lines generated by this process consistently express signals that induce both rat and human marrow cells to differentiate in vitro into osteoblastic cells. Further, implantation of the cellfree extracellular matrix from the immortalized chondrocytic cells causes vascularized bone to form in vivo in bony defects, but not in ectopic sites such as skeletal muscle. This study shows that molecular techniques can be used to generate bespoke human cell lines for bone tissue engineering. It also demonstrates thatmatrix material generated from human immortalized hypertrophic chondrocytic cells may provide an abundant, efficacious, and safer alternative to bone autograft—the currently preferred material for fracture repair.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Biosciences
Dentistry
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
R Medicine > RK Dentistry
Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert
ISSN: 1076-3279
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 03:10
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/17660

Citation Data

Cited 9 times in Google Scholar. View in Google Scholar

Cited 6 times in Scopus. View in Scopus. Powered By Scopus® Data

Cited 5 times in Web of Science. View in Web of Science.

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item