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A meta-analysis of single base-pair substitutions in translational termination codons ('nonstop' mutations) that cause human inherited disease.

Hamby, S. E., Thomas, Nicholas Stuart Tudor, Cooper, David Neil and Chuzhanova, Nadia 2011. A meta-analysis of single base-pair substitutions in translational termination codons ('nonstop' mutations) that cause human inherited disease. Human Genomics 5 (4) , pp. 241-264.

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Abstract

'Nonstop' mutations are single base-pair substitutions that occur within translational termination (stop) codons and which can lead to the continued and inappropriate translation of the mRNA into the 3'-untranslated region. We have performed a meta-analysis of the 119 nonstop mutations (in 87 different genes) known to cause human inherited disease, examining the sequence context of the mutated stop codons and the average distance to the next alternative in-frame stop codon downstream, in comparison with their counterparts from control (non-mutated) gene sequences. A paucity of alternative in-frame stop codons was noted in the immediate vicinity (0-49 nucleotides downstream) of the mutated stop codons as compared with their control counterparts (p = 7.81 × 10-4). This implies that at least some nonstop mutations with alternative stop codons in close proximity will not have come to clinical attention, possibly because they will have given rise to stable mRNAs (not subject to nonstop mRNA decay) that are translatable into proteins of near-normal length and biological function. A significant excess of downstream in-frame stop codons was, however, noted in the range 150-199 nucleotides from the mutated stop codon (p = 8.55 × 10-4). We speculate that recruitment of an alternative stop codon at greater distance from the mutated stop codon may trigger nonstop mRNA decay, thereby decreasing the amount of protein product and yielding a readily discernible clinical phenotype. Confirmation or otherwise of this postulate must await the emergence of a clearer understanding of the mechanism of nonstop mRNA decay in mammalian cells.

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Publisher: Henry Stewart Publications
ISSN: 1479-9364
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 03:21
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/20023

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