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A model of dynamic sacro-iliac joint instability from malrecruitment of gluteus maximus and biceps femoris muscles resulting in low back pain

Hossain, Munier and Nokes, Leonard Derek Martin 2005. A model of dynamic sacro-iliac joint instability from malrecruitment of gluteus maximus and biceps femoris muscles resulting in low back pain. Medical Hypotheses 65 (2) , pp. 278-281. 10.1016/j.mehy.2005.02.035

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Abstract

The objective of this work is to propose a biomechanical model of sacro–iliac joint dysfunction as a cause of low back pain. Sacro–iliac joint is known to be a source of low back pain. We also know that it is a very stable joint with little mobility. Surrounding lower limb and back muscles contribute a major part of this stability. Gait analysis studies have revealed an orderly sequence of muscle activation when we walk – that contributes to efficient stabilisation of the joint and effective weight transfer to the lower limb. Gluteus maximus fibres-lying almost perpendicular to the joint surfaces are ideally oriented for this purpose. Biceps femoris is another important muscle that can also influence joint stability by its proximal attachment to sacrotuberous ligament. Altered pattern of muscle recruitment has been observed in patients with low back pain. But we do not know the exact cause–effect relationship. Because of its position as a key linkage in transmission of weight from the upper limbs to the lower, poor joint stability could have major consequences on weight bearing. It is proposed that sacro–iliac joint dysfunction can result from malrecruitment of gluteus maximus motor units during weight bearing. This results in compensatory biceps over activation. The resulting soft tissue strain and joint instability may manifest itself in low back pain. If our hypothesis holds true, it may have positive implications for patients with sacro–iliac joint dysfunction – who could be offered a definite diagnosis and targeted physiotherapy. It may be possible to identify patients early in a primary care setting and offer direct physio referral. They could benefit from exercises to improve strengthening and recruitment of the affected muscles.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Engineering
Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
T Technology > TJ Mechanical engineering and machinery
ISSN: 0306-9877
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 01:44
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/2135

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