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The newly established primary care based Welsh Low Vision Service is effective and has improved access to low vision services in Wales

Ryan, Barbara, White, Sean Damian, Wild, John Millington, Court, Helen and Margrain, Thomas Hengist 2010. The newly established primary care based Welsh Low Vision Service is effective and has improved access to low vision services in Wales. Ophthalmic And Physiological Optics 30 (4) , pp. 358-364. 10.1111/j.1475-1313.2010.00729.x

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Abstract

Aim:  The aim of this study was to determine whether the new, primary care based, Welsh Low Vision Service (WLVS) improved access to low vision services in Wales and was effective. Method:  The impact of the WLVS was determined by measuring the number of low vision appointments; travel time to the nearest service provider; and waiting times for low vision services for 1 year before, and for 1 year after, its establishment. Change in self-report visual function (using the 7 item NEI-VFQ), near visual acuity, patient satisfaction and use of low vision aids were used to determine the effectiveness of the service. Results:  Following instigation of the WLVS, the number of low vision assessments increased by 51.7%, the waiting time decreased from more than 6 months to less than 2 months for the majority of people, and journey time to the nearest service provider reduced for 80% of people. Visual disability scores improved significantly (p < 0.001) by 0.79 logits and 97.42% patients found the service helpful. Conclusions:  The extension of low vision rehabilitation services into primary care identified a considerable unmet burden of need as evidenced by the substantial increase in the number of low vision assessments provided in Wales. The new service is effective and exhibits improved access.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Optometry and Vision Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > RE Ophthalmology
Uncontrolled Keywords: access; effectiveness; Geographic Information System; low vision; primary care
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing
ISSN: 0275-5408
Last Modified: 06 Jan 2019 23:42
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/22385

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