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Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Common Hospital Hand Disinfectants Against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Glycopeptide-Intermediates, S aureus, and Heterogeneous Glycopeptide-Intermediate S. aureus

Wootton, Mandy, Walsh, Timothy Rutland, Davies, Eleri-Lloyd and Howe, Robin A. 2009. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Common Hospital Hand Disinfectants Against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Glycopeptide-Intermediates, S aureus, and Heterogeneous Glycopeptide-Intermediate S. aureus. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology 30 (3) , pp. 226-232. 10.1086/595691

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Abstract

Background. The presence of methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and glycopeptide‐intermediate S. aureus (GISA) in hospitals poses a significant challenge to hospital infection control teams. The use of disinfectants for both surface and hand cleaning is an essential part of the infection control measures. Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of common hospital hand disinfectants against MRSA, GISA, and heterogeneous GISA (hGISA). Methods. For methicillin‐susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), MRSA, GISA, and hGISA, the levels of susceptibility to hand disinfectants and their active ingredients were determined. Suspension tests were performed on commercial handwashing products. Results. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 2‐propanol, chlorhexidine, and hexachlorophene were similar for all phenotypes. The MICs of cetrimide and triclosan were higher for the MRSA, GISA, and hGISA strains than for the MSSA strain. The MICs for the chlorhexidine‐containing agents Hibisol and Hibiscrub (AstraZeneca) and for the propanol‐containing agent Sterillium (Medline) were 1–2‐fold lower for the MSSA strains than for the MRSA, GISA, and hGISA strains. Suspension tests showed that the GISA and hGISA strains were less susceptible to the triclosan‐containing agent Aquasept (SSL) than were the MRSA and MSSA strains, with resistance increasing with glycopeptide resistance. Products containing Betadine (Purdue) were more effective against the GISA and hGISA strains than against the MRSA and MSSA strains, especially after the strain was exposed to the product for 30 seconds. Conclusions. Using the EN 1040 standard criteria for the performance of disinfectants, we determined that all agents, except 50% Aquasept for hGISA and 0.33% hexachlorophene for GISA, performed effectively. However, the GISA and hGISA strains were less susceptible to triclosan‐containing products, compared with the MRSA stains, but were more susceptible to products containing Betadine.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Systems Immunity Research Institute (SIURI)
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Additional Information: Pdf uploaded in accordance with publisher's policy at http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0899-823X/ (accessed 21/02/2014).
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISSN: 0899-823X
Date of First Compliant Deposit: 30 March 2016
Last Modified: 19 Oct 2019 03:04
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/24985

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