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Enhancement of perceptual representations by endogenous attention biases competition in response selection

Klemen, Jane, Verbruggen, Frederick, Skelton, Corrina and Chambers, Christopher D. 2011. Enhancement of perceptual representations by endogenous attention biases competition in response selection. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics 73 (8) , pp. 2514-2527. 10.3758/s13414-011-0188-5

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Abstract

Perception and response selection are core processes in the generation of overt behavior. Selective attention is known to facilitate behavioral performance by altering perceptual processes. It remains unclear, however, whether selective attention can aid the resolution of response conflict, and if so, at what stage of processing this takes place. In two experiments, an endogenous cuing task was combined with a flanker task to assess the interaction of selective attention with response selection. The results of Experiment 1 show that cuing reduces the flanker-congruency effect when the cue and flanker are presented in close temporal proximity to each other. The results of Experiment 2 demonstrate that pre- but not post-cuing the target reduced the congruency effect, showing that selective attention can affect performance, but is ineffective once stimulus processing has proceeded to response selection. Our results provide evidence that selective attention can aid the resolution of response conflict by altering early perceptual processing stages.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre (CUBRIC)
Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Uncontrolled Keywords: Attention: Selective – Perception and Action
Publisher: Springer
ISSN: 1943-3921
Last Modified: 07 Feb 2020 18:59
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/26768

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