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Environmental impacts of electricity generated by developing countries - issues, priorities and carbon-dioxide emissions

Pearson, Peter J. G. 1993. Environmental impacts of electricity generated by developing countries - issues, priorities and carbon-dioxide emissions. IEEE Proceedings-A-Science Measurement And Technology 140 (1) , pp. 100-108.

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Abstract

Owing to a very rapid growth in electricity generation in developing countries (DCs), the environmental impacts associated with it are likely to increase strikingly. Whereas in the past DCs have not given these environmental issues high priority, this may change in the future because of both internal and external political pressures. It may perhaps also change through a growing recognition of the dangers of not pursuing development pathways that are sustainable over the long-term. There are significant differences between DCs and industrialised countries (ICs) in their attitudes towards appropriate, affordable policy responses to the threat of global warming. The paper begins by examining how and why the environmental issues associated with DC electricity generation are becoming increasingly pressing, both for DCs and for ICs. The issues are classified into categories. There is then a detailed discussion of greenhouse gas scenarios and the possible roles that may be played by DCs in the growth and limitation of carbon dioxide emissions. The paper notes the difficulties of reaching workable agreements on global greenhouse gas limitations that include the DCs.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Architecture
Subjects: T Technology > TK Electrical engineering. Electronics Nuclear engineering
Uncontrolled Keywords: Electricity generation, Global warming
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 03:48
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/27201

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