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Putting it in context: the use of vignettes in qualitative interviewing

Jenkins, Nicholas, Bloor, Michael John, Fischer, Jan, Berney, Lee and Neale, Joanne 2010. Putting it in context: the use of vignettes in qualitative interviewing. Qualitative Research 10 (2) , pp. 175-198. 10.1177/1468794109356737

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Abstract

The article draws on two separate studies employing developmental vignettes (hypothetical scenarios which unfold through a series of stages) to interview research participants. One study used the ‘Davie’ vignette, which was a conventional fixed narrative, while in the second, the ‘Jack and Jenny’ vignettes were made interactive by hyperlinking a series of PowerPoint scenarios and making the choice of the succeeding slide dependent on the interviewee’s reaction to its predecessor. Our analytic standpoint, in respect of both vignettes, is that of Schutzian phenomenology. We point to differences in both topical and motivational relevances in the processes of interpretation undergone by participants in considering the vignette scenario and in the situation of action. However, we show that research participants’ responses to vignettes can yield data of interest in their own right as participants perform ‘Thou-orientations’ and ‘They-orientations’ in their consideration of the stimuli. We close with a comparative evaluation of the fixed ‘Davie’ and the interactive ‘Jack and Jenny’ vignettes.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Seafarers International Research Centre (SIRC)
Social Sciences (Includes Criminology and Education)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Uncontrolled Keywords: ethnomethodology; longitudinal interviewing; phenomenology; substance misuse; vignettes
Publisher: SAGE
ISSN: 1468-7941
Last Modified: 12 Jun 2019 02:42
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/28099

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