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Adolescent clinical outcomes for young people with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

Langley, Kate, Fowler, Tom Alan, Ford, Tamsin, Thapar, Ajay Kumar, van den Bree, Marianne Bernadette, Harold, Gordon Thomas, Owen, Michael John, O'Donovan, Michael Conlon and Thapar, Anita 2010. Adolescent clinical outcomes for young people with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. British Journal of Psychiatry 196 (3) , pp. 235-240. 10.1192/bjp.bp.109.066274

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Abstract

Background. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is recognised as a common, disabling condition. Little information is available regarding the long-term outcomes for individuals with ADHD in the UK. Aims. To examine the 5-year outcome for a UK cohort of children with diagnosed, treated ADHD and identify whether maternal and social factors predict key outcomes. Method. One hundred and twenty-six school-aged children (mean age 9.4 years, s.d. = 1.7) diagnosed with ADHD were reassessed 5 years later during adolescence (mean age 14.5 years, s.d. = 1.7) for ADHD, conduct disorder and other antisocial behaviours. Results. Most adolescents (69.8%) continued to meet full criteria for ADHD, were known to specialist services and exhibited high levels of antisocial behaviour, criminal activity and substance use problems. Maternal childhood conduct disorder predicted offspring ADHD continuity; maternal childhood conduct disorder, lower child IQ and social class predicted offspring conduct disorder symptoms. Conclusions. The treatment and monitoring of ADHD need to be intensified as outcomes are poor especially in offspring of mothers with childhood conduct disorder symptoms.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics (CNGG)
Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute (NMHRI)
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
Publisher: Royal College of Psychiatrists
ISSN: 0007-1250
Last Modified: 08 Aug 2019 20:53
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/28910

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