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Is iliotibial band syndrome really a friction syndrome?

Fairclough, John, Hayashi, Koji, Toumi, Hechmi, Lyons, Kathleen, Bydder, Graeme, Phillips, Nicola, Best, Thomas M. and Benjamin, Michael 2007. Is iliotibial band syndrome really a friction syndrome? Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 10 (2) , pp. 74-76. 10.1016/j.jsams.2006.05.017

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Abstract

Iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome is regarded as an overuse injury, common in runners and cyclists. It is believed to be associated with excessive friction between the tract and the lateral femoral epicondyle-friction which ‘inflames’ the tract or a bursa. This article highlights evidence which challenges these views. Basic anatomical principles of the ITB have been overlooked: (a) it is not a discrete structure, but a thickened part of the fascia lata which envelops the thigh, (b) it is connected to the linea aspera by an intermuscular septum and to the supracondylar region of the femur (including the epicondyle) by coarse, fibrous bands (which are not pathological adhesions) that are clearly visible by dissection or MRI and (c) a bursa is rarely present—but may be mistaken for the lateral recess of the knee. We would thus suggest that the ITB cannot create frictional forces by moving forwards and backwards over the epicondyle during flexion and extension of the knee. The perception of movement of the ITB across the epicondyle is an illusion because of changing tension in its anterior and posterior fibres. Nevertheless, slight medial–lateral movement is possible and we propose that ITB syndrome is caused by increased compression of a highly vascularised and innervated layer of fat and loose connective tissue that separates the ITB from the epicondyle. Our view is that ITB syndrome is related to impaired function of the hip musculature and that its resolution can only be properly achieved when the biomechanics of hip muscle function are properly addressed.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Biosciences
Healthcare Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Uncontrolled Keywords: Iliotibial band, Overuse injury, Sports injury
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 1440-2440
Last Modified: 08 May 2019 02:45
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/29613

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