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Sounds like sociality: new research on lithic contexts/technologies in Mesolithic Caithness

Mills, Stephen Francis and Pannett, Amelia 2009. Sounds like sociality: new research on lithic contexts/technologies in Mesolithic Caithness. Presented at: Mesolithic horizons : papers presented at the Seventh International Conference on the Mesolithic in Europe, Belfast, UK, 29 August - 2 September 2005. Published in: McCartan, S. B., Schulting, R., Warren, G. and Woodman, P. eds. Mesolithic Horizons: Papers presented at the Seventh International Conference on the Mesolithic in Europe, Belfast 2005. Oxford: Oxbow Books, pp. 715-719.

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Abstract

In this paper we argue that, alongside the creation of functional tools, lithic manufacture embodied a range of sensory experiences and provided a means through which prehistoric people gained expression and negotiated social strategies. While traditional approaches to lithic scatters provide detailed information about the activities occurring at sites, new research on the social significance of sound in the context of lithic manufacture adds an important dimension to our interpretations. Using data from a Mesolithic site in Caithness, northern Scotland, we draw on techniques developed in auditory archaeology, in which sound is considered a dynamic source of information: a means by which people express themselves. Based on this premise, we discuss ways in which we can move beyond the physical transformation of lithic material, to acknowledging that the process of manufacture resulted in multiple experiences integral to daily life.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: History, Archaeology and Religion
Subjects: C Auxiliary Sciences of History > CC Archaeology
Publisher: Oxbow Books
ISBN: 9781842173114
Related URLs:
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 04:00
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/30505

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