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Correlates of perceptual distortions in clinical and non-clinical populations using the Cardiff Anomalous Perceptions Scale (CAPS): Associations with anxiety and depression and a re-validation using a representative population sample

Bell, Vaughan, Halligan, Peter, Pugh, Katherine and Freeman, Daniel 2011. Correlates of perceptual distortions in clinical and non-clinical populations using the Cardiff Anomalous Perceptions Scale (CAPS): Associations with anxiety and depression and a re-validation using a representative population sample. Psychiatry Research 189 (3) , pp. 451-457. 10.1016/j.psychres.2011.05.025

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Abstract

Although the literature on hallucinations in psychiatric patients shows clear links with anxiety and depression, associations of affect with a wider array of anomalous perceptual experiences have been much less studied. This study investigated patients with psychosis (N = 29) and a non-clinical population (N = 193) using the Cardiff Anomalous Perceptions Scale (CAPS), a measure of perceptual distortion and associated distress, intrusiveness and frequency; along with measures of depression, anxiety and worry. The study also allowed a re-validation of the CAPS in a more representative sample of the UK population. Moderate, reliable correlations with depression, anxiety and worry were found in the non-clinical population with the association being stronger in psychotic patients. The study re-confirmed that anomalous perceptual experiences are common in the general population and that a significant minority (11.9%) have higher levels than the mean of psychotic patients. Scale reliability and validity were also re-confirmed, and the CAPS score was found to be unrelated to age or gender in either sample. As in the original study, factor analysis produced a three-factor solution, although factor theme was not fully replicated: as before, a cluster of first-rank symptoms emerged, but with equivocal evidence for a temporal lobe factor and no replication of a ‘chemosensation’ component.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords: Hallucination; Psychometric scale; Psychosis continuum; Schizophrenia
Publisher: Elsevier
ISSN: 0165-1781
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 04:00
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/30605

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