Cardiff University | Prifysgol Caerdydd ORCA
Online Research @ Cardiff 
WelshClear Cookie - decide language by browser settings

Toxoplasma and reaction time: role of toxoplasmosis in the origin, preservation and geographical distribution of Rh blood group polymorphism

Novotná, M., Havlíček, J., Smith, Andrew Paul, Kolbeková, P., Skallová, A., Klose, J., Gašová, Z., Písačka, M., Sechovská, M. and Flegr, J. 2008. Toxoplasma and reaction time: role of toxoplasmosis in the origin, preservation and geographical distribution of Rh blood group polymorphism. Parasitology 135 (11) , pp. 1253-1261. 10.1017/S003118200800485X

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

The RhD protein which is the RHD gene product and a major component of the Rh blood group system carries the strongest blood group immunogen, the D-antigen. This antigen is absent in a significant minority of the human population (RhD-negatives) due to RHD deletion or alternation. The origin and persistence of this RhD polymorphism is an old evolutionary enigma. Before the advent of modern medicine, the carriers of the rarer allele (e.g. RhD-negative women in the population of RhD-positives or RhD-positive men in the population of RhD-negatives) were at a disadvantage as some of their children (RhD-positive children born to pre-immunized RhD-negative mothers) were at a higher risk of foetal or newborn death or health impairment from haemolytic disease. Therefore, the RhD-polymorphism should be unstable, unless the disadvantage of carriers of the locally less abundant allele is counterbalanced by, for example, higher viability of the heterozygotes. Here we demonstrated for the first time that among Toxoplasma-free subjects the RhD-negative men had faster reaction times than Rh-positive subjects and showed that heterozygous men with both the RhD plus and RhD minus alleles were protected against prolongation of reaction times caused by infection with the common protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Our results suggest that the balancing selection favouring heterozygotes could explain the origin and stability of the RhD polymorphism. Moreover, an unequal prevalence of toxoplasmosis in different countries could explain pronounced differences in frequencies of RhD-negative phenotype in geographically distinct populations.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Uncontrolled Keywords: heterozygous advantage; balancing selection; evolution; blood antigen; parasite; Rhesus factor; blood group system
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISSN: 0031-1820
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 04:01
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/31074

Citation Data

Cited 31 times in Google Scholar. View in Google Scholar

Cited 46 times in Scopus. View in Scopus. Powered By Scopus® Data

Cited 32 times in Web of Science. View in Web of Science.

Actions (repository staff only)

Edit Item Edit Item