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Effects of personal carbon allowances on decision-making: evidence from an experimental simulation

Capstick, Stuart B. and Lewis, Alan 2010. Effects of personal carbon allowances on decision-making: evidence from an experimental simulation. Climate Policy 10 (4) , pp. 369-384. 10.3763/cpol.2009.0034

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Abstract

Behavioural influences of personal carbon trading (PCT) beyond those anticipated by pure price effects have been a theoretically attractive, yet empirically elusive, feature of such schemes. Computer-based simulation is used to examine the effects of participants' decisions on their personal carbon allocations within a PCT context. Evidence is presented about participants' tendencies to make more energy-conserving decisions as a consequence of attending to a restrictive and diminishing carbon allowance—independent of other financial and carbon cost information provided—suggesting that a form of ‘carbon budgeting’ is occurring. Further measurements indicate that the extent of carbon reduction achieved within the simulated PCT framework varies according to pro-environmental attitudes. Evidence is also presented that the size of participants' footprints correlates inversely with support for PCT; and that proenvironmental attitudes correlate positively with support for PCT. The advantages and drawbacks of using simulations for examining behavioural responses to PCT are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Uncontrolled Keywords: behaviour, energy consumption, energy demand, households, personal carbon trading, personal responsibility
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISSN: 1469-3062
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 04:02
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/31390

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