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A pilot study on the effect of topical negative pressure on quality of life

Mendonca, D. A., Drew, P. J., Harding, Keith Gordon and Price, Patricia Elaine 2007. A pilot study on the effect of topical negative pressure on quality of life. Journal of Wound Care 16 (2) , pp. 49-53.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To discover the impact of topical negative pressure (TNP) on quality of life. METHOD:An exploratory prospective cohort study was conducted on 26 patients undergoing TNP. The Cardiff Wound Impact Schedule (CWIS), a wound-specific tool, was used to investigate quality-of-life scores before therapy and four weeks after therapy or at wound closure. Wound dimensions were measured at both assessments, and the values for the CWIS domains (physical symptoms, social functioning, well-being and overall quality of life) were investigated using parametric and non-parametric tests. RESULTS:The mean duration of TNP therapy was 3.3 +/- 1.7 weeks. Topical negative pressure therapy helped to achieve complete wound closure in 14 patients (54%), and there was a mean reduction in wound surface area from 52.2 cm2 (range 4-150) to 26.8 cm2 (0-120). While there was no significant change in quality of life in patients whose wounds healed (1 +/- 11.9), the physical-functioning domain improved in obese patients (20 +/- 21, p < 0.05) and worsened in ambulatory patients (-3 +/- 13, p < 0.05). The portableTNP system had no significant impact on quality of life (-3 +/- 16), while the global quality-of-life score worsened with surgical intervention (-0.5 +/- 2, p < 0.05). CONCLUSION:Although TNP aids wound closure in patients with complex wounds, in selected cases their quality of life can worsen. This is the first exploratory cohort study of its kind, and has identified an urgent need to validate the use of patient-based outcome measures in TNP therapy. Such data can be useful in allocating resources and justifying funding in wound care.

Item Type: Article
Date Type: Publication
Status: Published
Schools: Medicine
Healthcare Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Publisher: Mark Allen Publishing Ltd
ISSN: 0969-0700
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2017 04:02
URI: http://orca.cf.ac.uk/id/eprint/31484

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